What’s In A Name?

What’s In A Name?

Names are so important. Think about it? If someone knows you and they hear your name, they’ll most likely have a rush of memories and something that reminds them of you come to mind, while someone who doesn’t know you, may draw conclusions. Names are what we identify ourselves with and in this day and age, one can create a username to go by that can represent them more than their real name can. That shows how important names are.

I’m not going to lie, I’m not too fond of my name. It’s seven letters long and almost no one pronounces it correctly, and don’t get me started on how baristas spell it. Growing up I felt self-conscious, and even until now, I always hid behind some sort of nickname that I felt sounded better and this was all rooted in my misplaced identity. The disconnection of my name with what I thought my identity was made me never fully be myself. It isn’t until recently that I felt like I grew into my name. View Post

Social Media Breakdown

Social Media Breakdown

So I tried to do Liv’s challenge to cut my social media usage and guess what? I failed. I don’t mean that I checked my phone one time more before going to bed than I promised to do, I mean that I didn’t change any habits at all. It’s embarrassing to admit but this failure showed me how much I spend on social media and is reinforcing why I need to cut back.

I feel like so often we try to justify our social media usage. We think we’re just passing the time while waiting for our coffee or just informing ourselves about the current events, but soon enough we see a selfie and then we’re tweets deep in someone else’s live. We’ve all done it. Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, they’re all useful tools until they stop being tools and becoming distractions from life.

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The Value of Your Story

The Value of Your Story

I came to Christ when I was thirteen. I still remember my parents telling my siblings and me that they were going to church and we tagged along and it was great. I was young, still in middle school so I hadn’t experienced much of anything negative, which in hindsight I am so grateful for. My parents have such a powerful testimony of how and where God rescued them, and although people always tried to make it seem like a family testimony, deep down I knew that their story wasn’t my story.

Sometimes people expect to hear great testimonies of how God rescued people. People want to hear about cancers being healed, extreme provisions, and, whatever big thing that led them to Christ, which are completely amazing to hear. But for me, I had a quiet life, no big rescue, no big miracle, just a small confession of faith. Truthfully, I only remember my life in Christ at this point, which is good, but it left me feeling like there’s nothing to impress people with. For a long time this became a struggle, especially when trying to tell people about Jesus, because I felt like I had nothing to entice people to get interested. Thankfully I was never into drugs and vices, so that I can be grateful for. However, it was hard to see how people would value the word of those who were rescued from the darkest pits, while I was just average. Their stories are important and resonated with people, but I knew my quiet story had a purpose with God.

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Read or Dread: Crash the Chatterbox

Read or Dread: Crash the Chatterbox

I don’t read many non-fiction books. This might come as a shock but I only started getting into reading about two years ago. So the thought of reading a book that didn’t have characters to follow made me kind of hesitant.

However, I needed a new way to connect with God, so when I saw Crash the Chatterbox, I knew I had to grab it because it’s about one of my greatest struggles. I tend not to read other people’s reviews about books until after I’m done, but I read the ones for this one and it was pretty divided so I knew I had to read it with an open mind. What Steven Furtick is talking about in this book, is how to squash the voices, in our minds and from those around us, to just focus on what God is saying. The book teaches you to look at what your thoughts have been like and analyze where they are coming from.

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Things You Should Know As A Commuter in College

Things You Should Know As A Commuter in College

Whenever planning for college is going on, you bet that most lists are of what to take to your dorm room and decorations, but rarely do people stop to think about the commuters. So here I am representing. Holla. I was a commuter all 4 years of college, and I commuted from far which everyone thought was crazy, but I knew I didn’t want extra debt from staying on campus. Commuting has its benefits, but it also has its downside and I feel that you never know what to expect when every type of advice is directed to those who dorm. So here is my attempt to ease that anxiety.

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No, You’re Not Missing Out On the College Experience But You Might Feel Left Out

I can’t even count how many times people told me this and for a long time I believed it. Since dorming is such a big part of the college experience, people automatically assume that if you’re not doing it, you’re missing out. However, the things that make up a college experience are friends, events, classes, and those are all things you can experience without living on campus. At first you might feel left out because people spend 24/7 together while you’re only there for a few hours, but it’s all about getting involve. Yes, it might take a bit more effort to actually show up, but you’re not missing out.

Things Take Extra Effort

People can so easily walk out and gather together because they all live together. Sometimes classes that end at 9pm may not seem so appealing because you have to drive home. A lot of the things are usually designed for those who dorms, so you have to analyze if it’s worth it to stay for that late SGA meeting or staying on campus for hours. You also have to figure out how to make time pass by in between classes, which means you’ll either be in the library or taking naps in your car. It gets tiring, I do admit, but you just have to get in the hang of doing things to work for you.

You Get the Best of Both Worlds

I mean, you get to go home whenever you want and not deal with obnoxious college kids. You don’t have to be forced to purchase a meal plan to get horrible food at the dining hall. You can show up to school events and go home if it’s terrible and sleep in your own comfy bed that hasn’t been slept on by someone else. You don’t have to live by the rules of your RA and you can even sleep over with a friend if you really want to feel the dorm experience. You can take the good from each world, so that’s always fun. There’s always two sides to the coin.

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Being a commuter definitely gave me a different perspective, but it didn’t change the way I enjoyed college. We may feel underrepresented and you might feel like a unicorn when you tell people you’re a commuter but you shouldn’t feel like an outsider.

If you’re a commuter, what are somethings you noticed about your college experience? What are some tips you can give?